Published On: Wed, Jan 16th, 2019

All Things Sex in India: Phone Sex, Prostitution, Sex Toys, and More Unveiled

Sexuality in India is still considered taboo in modern society, but this hasn’t stopped Indians from embracing it.

While conservative views on sexuality create a puritan sheen on the surface of modern day India, just below its surface boils the brackish waters of fluid desire and kinky carnal liberalism. This juxtaposition between practice and discussion is causing the country some serious problems. Due to this unspoken agreement between the peoples of India, STD rates, homophobia, and violence have sprung forth in recent decades. However, some companies that offer Indians a safe and open space to engage in their unspoken needs are starting to turn the tide on social convention.

In ancient times, India contributed much of the world’s common day sexual progression and education through written texts and the arts, but pressure from political and religious groups during the colonial era shut down the country’s rich history of sexual embrace. Resulting in contemporary India being confused and superficially repressed when it comes to discussing sexuality. Many are pushing legislators to shake off the skin of Puritanism and go back to their historical roots of more liberal sexual policy.

Phone Sex in India

“Phone sex in India is something that has been incredibly popular since it’s advent. We have always catered to our clients needs without concern about who they are or what they are interested in.” Indian Sex Talk is an operator that provides phone sex in India, along with other internet based erotic fun- like blogs and webcam services. Their spokesperson tells us that “The only thing we don’t cater to is any form of sexual abuse. We believe that sex is incredibly beautiful, but only when it is consensual and enjoyed by all of the adult engaging parties”.

In recent history, a spike in STD/STI rates began to plague the country, largely because of people with alternate sexualities being forced to practice their preferences in unregulated sex clubs or by using desperate sex workers. Homosexual and transgender violence was rampant in the 90s and early 2000s, as well as cases of rape. “This is something that we are beginning to see become a trend in cultures that are more sexually repressed.” Says Sarah Turin, an anthropological student at one of India’s top universities. “People will always find a way to bring their sexual fantasies to life. If a country doesn’t provide an outlet for non-deviant behaviors, sexual proclivities will often become deviant, and largely harmful.” She postulates.

Prostitution

Prior to the age of colonialism and more modern day puritanical elements of Islam, India had a rich history of sexual embrace. In historical Hinduism and Buddhism, sexuality was largely viewed as a science. Nudity in art was common and ancient texts, such as the Kama sutra, were produced, depicting and illustrating how to best achieve pleasure within marriage. Pioneering the practice of sexual education for the masses. While prostitution wasn’t exactly a legal process, it was considered a commodity that was undeniable, so it was regulated to reduce violence and disease.

In the north, during the Mughal era, tawaifs or high level courtesans catered to the country’s nobility. Versed in not only the arts of sex, but also the physical arts, such as dance, theater, and music. Even during colonial rule, brothels were established and ran for British troops. As legitimate concerns about sex slavery and trafficking rose, the country instituted vague laws defining what is, and isn’t, considered prostitution.

Under Indian law, a woman may use her body in exchange for material benefit, providing that it’s not in public, and it’s not advertised. Sex workers are not protected under normal labor laws, but they do possess rights that allow them to be rehabilitated and “rescued” should they want to get out of the business. In 2007, there were an estimated three million illegal sex workers operating in India, with over 35% of them under the age of 18.

Current laws regarding sex work are exceptionally vague, and most workers are poor women and children who have been kidnapped and forced into the trade. Diseases like HIV/AIDS have seen an increase in the last decade. Sex workers can be terrorized and punished by those who use these vague “public indecency” laws against them. Recently, a large push has come to legalize prostitution in order to avoid these types of exploitation, reduce the threat of “middlemen” such as pimps, and integrate medical care to help create a decline in the prevalence of HIV/AIDS within the community.

Sex Toys and Equality

Quite possibly the loudest voice among citizens pushing for more realistic and liberal views on sex in India are those associated with the sex toy industry. “Sex toys provide people with the tools necessary to explore and improve on their own intimacies” Turin remarks. “It allows couples and individuals to safely and confidently explore their own sexualities within their own homes.” Turin believes that understanding sexuality is perhaps the most important step to creating a less violent world.

“Sexuality is something that needs to be discussed. Children need to be educated early. Removing the sense of taboo, and inserting an understanding of personal empowerment and boundaries will help reduce the violence that misunderstanding causes.” Also noteworthy is the fact that many of India’s largest sex toy companies are being spearheaded by women. Which is serving to provide a voice for a community that the discussion of sexuality has previously left by the wayside.

A growing mandate is beginning to put pressure on India to start to leave their more conservative views on sexuality behind. One by one, these industries and the millions of clients that they cater to, are starting to shift the way the country looks at its sexuality, making it a safer and more loving place for everyone.

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